JOUR:6871 – WordPress Assignment

Preamble:

Assignments for this class include creating a WordPress website showcasing 10 objects related to your research project, integrating social media, and posting reflections on your process. The site will also serve as your presentation guide for the Midway Presentations scheduled for February 25th. Each of you will have 45 minutes to present your work and brainstorm ideas with the class.

The second assignment will be a Korsakow project, representing these same 10 objects in a non-linear way. The assignment will ask you to think through the connections between objects, and how to display the contents of your research in an interactive way. This project will also be embedded in your website.

There will also be a series of workshops exploring digital mapping, torrent dissemination, managing photographs, web archiving, content aggregation, and so on, which you may also chose to document through your blog. You can use any or all of what will be assembled in the seminar and workshop series for your final presentation, on April 29th.

Assignment:

Based on A History of New York in 50 Objects By SAM ROBERTS, featured in the New York Times, this assignment asks that you deconstruct your research into 10 discrete objects.

– ‘Objects’ can be participants (interviewees), methods (components, technologies or concepts of your approach), places, moments, concepts, or physical objects.

– For each object, create a distinct blog post.

– Provide a brief summary of each object’s relationship to your project.

– Provide and image for each object. Images can be screengrabs, video stills, photographs, scans, etc. Please reference them properly and identify the source (even if you own / took the photo etc).

– Write a blog post summary that contextualizes your collection.

– Write a short reflection piece on the process of creating a research archive in WordPress, and featuring your research as a collection. Feel free to point out the limitations alongside the value of this tool.

– Use tags, categories, posts, and pages to shape your archive and give it context.

– Include a page about yourself, an explanation of how you situate yourself within your research.

– Consider integrating social media into your archive.

– Keep as many research notes in this archive as you need, for the rest of the class.

– Use your research archive to present your research to the class during the midway presentations as well as the final showcase.

 

Archiving Tweets (#)

A friend asked me how to archive a conversation happening over Twitter involving quilting using the hashtag #talknt

 

Step 1:

http://search.twitter.com/search.atom?q=%23hashtag

becomes: 

http://search.twitter.com/search.atom?q=%23talknt

Step 2:

Then you take that bit of code and paste it into Google Reader’s Subscribe and it’ll give you this:

 

Screen shot 2013-01-22 at 8.31.32 PM

 

More info:

http://theinfobabe.blogspot.com/2011/06/twitter-rss-feed-creation-cheat-sheet.html

 

http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/hacking-an-rss-feed-for-twitter-hashtags/35895

 

JOUR:6871 Syllabus – Research Archive: Aggregate. Curate. Disseminate.

Research Archive: Aggregate. Curate. Disseminate.

SPRING 2013
Monday, 2:00 – 4:30
Armory 1B01
Dr. Mél Hogan

Office hours: Monday 11am – 2pm or by appointment.
* Use #JOUR6871 as a Twitter hashtag

This course focuses on the creation of a multimodal personal research archive and the theories that inform its production.

As researchers, our interest in the archive as a site of theoretical and pragmatic inquiry has been transformed by emergent media, and specifically, the new affordances of digitization in terms of access, storage, circulation and searchability. As such, both the ways in which we generate for the archive, and our reliance on what we can extract from it, have become increasingly important conceptual and methodological issues. Arguably, ontologies of the archive — which remain largely based on authenticity, rivalry, and the originality of artefacts and official records — are always challenged by new and emergent media.

This seminar will attempt to follow some of these discussions as they intersect different fields of scholarship and practice: media archaeology, feminist, queer, and post-colonial theories, and communication and media studies. Together, we will engage with the archive as place, concept and representational practice.

To do this, we will walk you through the necessary steps in creating a personal research archive using the free open source content management system, WordPress, as well as exploring tools for non-linear database driven media, such as Korsakow, and other options tailored to your needs and particular areas of interest. This class should nudge you along your current research trajectory, while also, hopefully, challenging your research direction in positive ways.

This course includes engagement with theories of production, weekly class discussions, screenings, readings, student presentations, collaborative in-class work, field trips, lectures and guest lectures, workshops, media archaeological interventions, and hands-on demonstrations… all this to help you gain a better understanding of the research tools at your disposal, deepen your knowledge of those you are currently using, as well as introduce new ones. All production work follows from a critical engagement with media and an awareness of methodology, positionally, and process.

A laptop is required for the course. You will also be required to purchase server space and a domain name if you do not already have one (the how-to pertaining to this will be covered in class). No specific technical skills are required for this course other than an openness to learning.

Evaluations and Assignments:

Participation and Attendance – 20%
Research Archive / Reflections – 20%
Korsakow Project / Reflections – 20%
Presentations on Readings (10% x2) – 20%
Final Presentation – 20%

Readings and media for this class include academic articles, blog posts, interviews, podcasts and videos, from different locations and timeframes, each offering different perspectives on the topics, and delivering a message in a different format. You will present (20 minutes) on two of these topics throughout the term, leading the seminar discussion for that week (total 45 minutes).

Assignments include creating a WordPress website showcasing 10 objects related to your research project, integrating social media, and posting reflections on your process. The site will also serve as your presentation guide for the Midway Presentations scheduled for February 25th. Each of you will have 45 minutes to present your work and brainstorm ideas with the class.

The second assignment will be a Korsakow project, representing these same 10 objects in a non-linear way. The assignment will ask you to think through the connections between objects, and how to display the contents of your research in an interactive way. This project will also be embedded in your website.

There will also be a series of workshops exploring digital mapping, torrent dissemination, managing photographs, web archiving, content aggregation, and so on, which you may also chose to document through your blog. You can use any or all of what will be assembled in the seminar and workshop series for your final presentation, on April 29th or May 6th.

 14-Jan / Intro to the Archives and Digital Curation

  • Class intro
  • Sign up for presentations on readings
  • Buy and set up of domain name and server space for WordPress
  • Visit to the UC Archives/Special Collections (3pm) Norlin, Room N435

21-Jan / BREAK

28-Jan  / Database Logics

  • Presentation on readings
  • Intro to WordPress: database and CMS installation
  • Explanation of first assignment

Readings:

Wendy HK Chun. 2008. “The Enduring Ephemeral, or the Future Is a Memory.” Critical Inquiry. Vol. 35, No. 1 (Autumn 2008), pp. 148-171. The University of Chicago Press http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/595632

Video: http://video.dma.ucla.edu/video/wendy-chun-the-enduring-ephemeral-or-the-future-is-a-memory/19

Ramesh Srinivasan “Considering how digital culture enables a multiplicity of knowledges” (Lift09 EN) https://vimeo.com/5520100

Lev Manovich “Database as Symbolic Form” http://classes.dma.ucla.edu/Spring06/259M/readings/manovich-lev_rev2.pdf

Brett Stalbaum “An Interpretative Framework for Contemporary Database Practice in the Arts” http://classes.dma.ucla.edu/Spring06/259M/readings/stalbaum_brett.pdf

Christiane Paul. The Database as System and Cultural Form: Anatomies of Cultural Narratives http://visualizinginfo.pbworks.com/f/db-system-culturalform.pdf

4-Feb / Access

  • Presentation on Readings
  • WordPress: theme install; overview of Dashboard, tags, categories, pages, themes, widgets, plugins
  • Discuss CMS: Omeka, StaceyApp, Mukurtu and Indexhibit as alternatives

Readings:

Josephine Bosma. 2011. “The Gap between Now and Then: On the Conservation of Memory” Nettitudes: Let’s Talk Net Art http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/nettitudes-josephine-bosma/1102270963

Jane Anderson. 2009. (Colonial) Archives and (Copyright) Law, NOMOREPOTLUCKS, No. 4. July–Aug. 2009, http://www.nomorepotlucks.org/article/copie-no4/colonial-archives-andcopyright-law

Katie Shilton and Ramesh Srinivasan. 2010. “Participatory Appraisal and Arrangement for Multicultural Archival Collections” Archivaria 63: Special Section on Archives and Culture http://rameshsrinivasan.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/6-Shilton-Srinivasan-Multicultural-Archives-final.pdf

Anjali Arondekar. 2005. “Without a Trace: Sexuality and the Colonial Archive.” Journal of the History of Sexuality, Volume 14, Numbers 1/2, January 2005/April 2005, pp. 10-27

 

11-Feb / Media Archaeology

  • Presentation on Readings
  • Class visit to Media Archaeology Lab (3:00pm) for artist talk with Joel Swanson

Readings:

Jussi Parikka. 2010. CTheory Interview Archaeologies of Media Art www.ctheory.net/articles.aspx?id=631

Erkki Huhtamo. 1996. “Time Traveling in the Gallery: An Archeological Approach in Media Art” from Time Traveling in the Gallery, edited by Moser and MacLeod.(1996) http://aaaaarg.org/text/43667/time-traveling-gallery-archeological-approach-media-art

Jussi Parikka. 2011. “”With each project I find myself reimagining what cinema might be”: An Interview with Zoe Beloff” http://www.electronicbookreview.com/thread/imagenarrative/numerous

Trevor Owens. 2012. “Media Archaeology and Digital Stewardship: An interview with Lori Emerson” http://blogs.loc.gov/digitalpreservation/2012/10/media-archaeology-and-digital-stewardship-an-interview-with-lori-emerson/

Michael Gruber. 2012. “Digital Archaeology” Wired http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/1.05/1.5_archaeology.html

David Rosenthal. 2012. “How much of the web is archived?” http://blog.dshr.org/2013/01/how-much-of-web-is-archived.html

 

 18-Feb  / Error 404

  • Presentation on Readings
  • WordPress: database migration and file backups

Readings:

Lisa Gitelman. 2006. Chapter 4 New Media </Body> in Always Already New The MIT Press, Cambridge Massachusetts. pp. 123-150.

New Aesthetics, New Anxieties. 2012. CURATORIAL READINGS 5. A BLOGPOST AS EXHIBITION 6. COLLECT, REMIX, CONTRIBUTE -> CURATE? 7. ERROR 404: NO AESTHETIC FOUND. pp. 26-38. http://aaronland.info/NA.html

 

25-Feb / MIDWAY PRESENTATIONS

  • Presentations using WordPress
  • Post your Reflection on your website

 

4-Mar  / Archival Agency

  • Intro to Korsakow
  • Visit to Gnip 3pm

Readings:

Arjun Appadurai “Archive and Aspiration” http://entreculturas.info/system/docs/10/original/Appadurai._Archive_and_Aspiration.pdf?1276464953

Eric Ketelaar. 2002. “The Archive as a Time Machine” The ICT-industry and public sector partnership: to promote the preservation and accessibility of the European archival heritage Closing Speech of the DLM-Forum 2002 Barcelona, 8 May 2002 http://www.mybestdocs.com/ketelaar-e-dlm2002.htm

Mike Featherstone. 2006. “Archive” Theory Culture Society 23: 591 http://tcs.sagepub.com/content/23/2-3/591

 

11-Mar / Documentary Practices

  • Presentation on Readings
  • Korsakow

Readings:

Jaimie Baron. 2007. “Contemporary Documentary Film and “Archive Fever”: History, the Fragment, the Joke.” Velvet Light Trap: A Critical Journal of Film & Television; Fall2007, Issue 60, p13-24, 12p, 3 Black and White Photographs https://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?sid=87819611-cfa3-408c-a88a-30eaa5981ebf%40sessionmgr112&vid=3&hid=111&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=aph&AN=27057983

Elizabeth Freeman. 2010. Chapter 1: Junk Inheritance, Bad Timing In Time Binds: Queer Temporalities, Queer Histories

“When Matt Met Florian” 2012. Korsakow Blog http://korsakow.org/when-matt-met-florian/

Florian Thalhofer. 2003.  “IF THEN” Dox-Magazine, Issue #46, April 2003 http://www.thalhofer.com/korsakow/ksy/pages/udk_thalhofer_ENG.html

Adrian Miles vlog: http://vogmae.net.au/vlog/

 

18-Mar  / Photography

  • Visit to UC Archives (full class)

Readings:

Allan Sekula. 1986. “The Body and the Archive.” October; Vol. 39 (Winter, 1986), pp. 3-64. The MIT Press.

Essays by Geoffrey Batchen and Benjamin Buchloch (pp. 45-60) in Deep Storage: Collecting, Storing, and Archiving in Art. Munich and New York: Prestel, 1998.

Daniel Palmer. 2011. “Emotional Archives: Online Photo Sharing and the Cultivation of the Self.” Photographies.

 

25-Mar  / BREAK

1-Apr  / Torrents and the Archive of Transmission

  • Guest lecture and torrent workshop by Eric Coombs

 

8-Apr / Maps and Locative Media

  • Presentation on Readings
  • Introduction to Google Maps and Mapbox

Readings:

The Trouble with Geoportals. 2012. MapBox Blog. http://mapbox.com/blog/trouble-with-geoportals/

Johannes Thumfart. “The Space Building Animal: Post Internet Politics of Space from the Point of View of the History of Ideas” PWR #6 http://www.mediafire.com/view/?n68qeqk6p9bhgu1 or http://aaaaarg.org/text/43825/space-building-animal-post-internet-politics-space-point-view-history-ideas

Guy Debord. 1955. “Introduction to a Critique of Urban Geography” Situationist International Online http://www.cddc.vt.edu/sionline/presitu/geography.html

Pascal Neis et al. 2012. “The Street Network Evolution of Crowdsourced Maps: OpenStreetMap in Germany 2007–2011” In Future Internet 2012, 4, 1-21.

IMG MGMT_ The Nine Eyes of Google Street View http://www.artfagcity.com/2009/08/12/img-mgmt-the-nine-eyes-of-google-street-view/

MediaNOLA http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TDslQ0rlp-4 /// http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2B97pIJRUkU&feature=relmfu

 

15-Apr  / Performing the Archive

  • Presentation on Readings

Readings:

Lisa Nakumura. 2006. “Cybertyping and the Work of Race in the digital Reproduction.” In New Media Old Media A History and Theory Reader Edited by Wendy Hui Kyong Chun and Thomas Keenan.

Coco Fusco. 1994. “The Other History of Intercultural Performance” in TDR (1988-) vol. 38, No. 1 (Spring 1994) pp 143-167. http://www.csun.edu/~vcspc00g/301/CFusco-OtherHistory-TDR.pdf

Diana Taylor. “Acts of Transfer” from The Archive and the Repertoire: Performing Cultural Memory in the Americas. Durham: Duke UP, 2003

Amma Y. Ghartey-Tagoe Kootin. 2012. Brakhage Center Lunchtime Series. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5x8gGRz1cA (3 parts)

 

22-Apr  / Dirty Data

  • Presentation on Readings (maybe after visit, tbc)
  • Visit to Wyndham Hannaway, 839 Pearl Street at 2pm

Readings:

Richard Maxwell and Toby Miller. 2012. Chapter 2 “Words” and Chapter 3 “Screens” in Greening the Media. Oxford University Press. (Norlin Library—Stacks HM1206 .M3759 2012)

Kyle Chayka. 2012. “The Aesthetics of Data Storage” http://hyperallergic.com/58330/the-aesthetics-of-data-storage/

Greenpeace International. 2011. How dirty is your data? A Look at the Energy Choices That Power Cloud Computing http://www.greenpeace.org/international/Global/international/publications/climate/2011/Cool%20IT/dirty-data-report-greenpeace.pdf

James Glanz. 2012. “Power, Pollution and the Internet” New York Times  (September 22, 2012) http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/23/technology/data-centers-waste-vast-amounts-of-energy-belying-industry-image.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

 

29-Apr / Final Presentations

  • Prep for final presentations

 

6-May  / Final Presentations

  • Final presentations

 

OTHER IMPORTANT POLICIES

 

ACCOMODATIONS

If you qualify for accommodations because of a disability, please submit to your professor a letter from Disability Services in a timely manner (for exam accommodations provide your letter at least one week prior to the exam) so that your needs can be addressed. Disability Services determines accommodations based on documented disabilities. Contact Disability Services at 303-492-8671 or by e-mail at dsinfo@colorado.edu<mailto:dsinfo@colorado.edu>.

 

If you have a temporary medical condition or injury, see Temporary Injuries under Quick Links at Disability Services website<http://www.alumniconnections.com/links/link.cgi?l=3958265&h=59933&e=UCBI-20130104183129> and discuss your needs with your professor.

 

RELIGIOUS OBSERVANCES
Campus policy regarding religious observances requires that faculty make every effort to deal reasonably and fairly with all students who, because of religious obligations, have conflicts with scheduled exams, assignments or required attendance. In this class, {{insert your procedures here}}
See full details at http://www.colorado.edu/policies/fac_relig.html<http://www.alumniconnections.com/links/link.cgi?l=3958268&h=59933&e=UCBI-20130104183129>
CLASSROOM BEHAVIOR POLICY
Students and faculty each have responsibility for maintaining an appropriate learning environment. Those who fail to adhere to such behavioral standards may be subject to discipline. Professional courtesy and sensitivity are especially important with respect to individuals and topics dealing with differences of race, color, culture, religion, creed, politics, veteran’s status, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity and gender expression, age, disability, and nationalities. Class rosters are provided to the instructor with the student’s legal name. I will gladly honor your request to address you by an alternate name or gender pronoun. Please advise me of this preference early in the semester so that I may make appropriate changes to my records. See policies at
http://www.colorado.edu/policies/classbehavior.html<http://www.alumniconnections.com/links/link.cgi?l=3958271&h=59933&e=UCBI-20130104183129> and at
http://www.colorado.edu/studentaffairs/judicialaffairs/code.html#student_code
<http://www.alumniconnections.com/links/link.cgi?l=3958272&h=59933&e=UCBI-20130104183129>
DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT POLICY
The University of Colorado at Boulder Discrimination and Harassment Policy and Procedures, the University of Colorado Sexual Harassment Policy and Procedures, and the University of Colorado Conflict of Interest in Cases of Amorous Relationships policy apply to all students, staff, and faculty.  Any student, staff, or faculty member who believes s/he has been the subject of sexual harassment or discrimination or harassment based upon race, color, national origin, sex, age, disability, creed, religion, sexual orientation, or veteran status should contact the Office of Discrimination and Harassment (ODH) at 303-492-2127 or the Office of Student Conduct (OSC) at 303-492-5550. Information about the ODH, the above referenced policies, and the campus resources available to assist individuals regarding discrimination or harassment can be obtained at http://www.colorado.edu/odh

HONOR CODE

All students of the University of Colorado at Boulder are responsible for knowing and adhering to the academic integrity policy of this institution. Violations of this policy may include: cheating, plagiarism, aid of academic dishonesty, fabrication, lying, bribery, and threatening behavior.  All incidents of academic misconduct shall be reported to the Honor Code Council
(honor@colorado.edu; 303-735-2273). Students who are found to be in violation of the academic integrity policy will be subject to both academic sanctions from the faculty member and non-academic sanctions (including but not limited to university probation, suspension, or expulsion). Other information on the Honor Code can be found at
http://www.colorado.edu/policies/honor.html  and at
http://www.colorado.edu/academics/honorcode/

 

Spring 2013 Seminar – Research Archive: Aggregate. Curate. Disseminate.

Research Archive: Aggregate. Curate. Disseminate.

SPRING 2013
Monday, 2:00 – 4:30
Armory 1B01
Dr. Mél Hogan

This course focuses on the creation of a multimodal personal research archive and the theories that inform its production.

As researchers, our interest in the archive as a site of theoretical and pragmatic inquiry has been transformed by emergent media, and specifically, the new affordances of digitization in terms of access, storage, circulation and searchability. As such, both the ways in which we generate for the archive, and our reliance on what we can extract from it, have become increasingly important conceptual and methodological issues. Arguably, ontologies of the archive are always challenged by emergent media, which remain largely based on authenticity, rivalry, and the originality of artefacts and official records.

This seminar will attempt to follow some of these discussions as they intersect different fields of scholarship and practice: media archaeology, feminist, queer, and post-colonial theories, and communication and media studies. Together, we will engage with the archive as place, concept and representational practice.

To do this, we will walk you through the necessary steps in creating a personal research archive using the free open source content management system, WordPress, as well as exploring tools for non-linear database driven media, such as Korsakow, and other options tailored to your needs and particular areas of interest. This class should nudge you along your current research trajectory, while also, hopefully, challenging your research direction in positive ways.

This course includes engagement with theories of production, weekly class discussions, screenings, readings, student presentations, collaborative in-class work, field trips, lectures and guest lectures, workshops, media archaeological interventions, and hands-on demonstrations… all this to help you gain a better understanding of the research tools at your disposal, deepen your knowledge of those you are currently using, as well as introduce new ones. All production work follows from a critical engagement with media and an awareness of methodology, positionally, and process.

A laptop is required for the course. You will also be required to purchase server space and a domain name if you do not already have one (the how-to pertaining to this will be covered in class). No specific technical skills are required for this course other than an openness to learning.

Readings for this course include scholarly articles (Ramesh Srinivasan, Wendy H K Chun, Jussi Parikka, Anjali Arondekar, etc.), texts addressing theories of production (Adrian Miles, Florian Thalhofer, Tara McPherson, etc.), blog posts (Henry Jenkins, Media Praxis, etc.), podcasts and online video (UbuWeb, Internet Archive, etc.).

* thank you Monika Gagnon.

Creating Database + User from your Control Panel

Log in to your website/cp and click on MySQL Databases:

 

 

 

 

 

Step 1: Your database name will start with your domain name (mine is melhogan.com so it starts with melhogan_). Write in a db name of your choosing: “example”.

 

Step 2: Create a “user” for this database with all Privileges checked. (A good password is important).

Step 3: Enable this user – click on Enable Remote.

Step 4: Note down all this info carefully. You will need it to install your CMS (config.php)

  • Database Name Database Name used by your CMS (example)
  • Database Username Username used to access Database (userone)
  • Database Password Password used by Username to access Database (*********)
  • Database Host The hostname of your Database Server. A port number, Unix socket file path or pipe may be needed as well. (‘localhost’ generally works)

Porting over an Indexibit Site (DB and Content)

Time’s up to renew the domain name for the online component of my PhD project, but instead of dishing out the cash, I am opting to move my site — to “archive” it. It took me a few frustrating hours to port over the database and web contents, when really, in the end, it was just one little glitch preventing the transition from being complete: that damn invisible .htaccess file! So I’ve decided to share my process here, though admitedly you will have to have some sense of how all of this works to follow along. There’s a lot of helpful stuff online already dealing with this, so I’ve simly added what I thought was missing. But I recommend checking here, here, and even here for more details, to get started. Also, the migration process is different depending on the CMS you are using, so steps might differ for WordPress etc. (I plan to document steps for WP in the next few weeks.) These are the steps for (the old) Indexhibit CMS, using Cpanel and phpMyAdmin.

  1. Back up your site. Download the entire www folder to your desktop.
  2. Export your OLD database. Go to “Custom”; Format: “SQL” and save it with a .sql extenstion.
  3. Import your database to the new space.
  4. Create a new user for this NEW database and enable it.
  5. Note the database info: db name, user, password and localhost.
  6. Change your config file so it speaks to your NEW database using the info noted above.
  7. Upload content to your new site (including the invisible .htaccess file. *You might have to duplicate the .htaccess, name it htaccess without the period to copy it over, and then remove the period once it is in its NEW place.)
  8. Manual tweaks: log in to your new indexhibit site (http://yoursite.com/ndxz-studio/) and adjust all the links you entered manually within posts etc.

 

Public Evernote Feed Embed in WP

Evernote is a good way to clip media from the web, so it’s also an efficient tool for aggregating your online research findings.

There are a few easy ways to then embed your (public) notebook(s) into your research blog/website. So far the best solutions I’ve found for WordPress are:

1 iframe snippet;
2 the RSS feed in the sidebar;
3 HungryFEED.

NB: I haven’t done anything here pertaining to CSS or design for how the content displays – all are set to defaults for the purposes of this post. But you can adjust everything below in terms of how it looks…


** it doesn’t matter what you name this Notebook, but probably putting “Public” in the title is helpful to keep stuff organised.

Copy the link generated – you’ll need it for embedding.

 

 

1. For a quick and dirty iframe embed: (you can use iframe to embed just about anything):

Write this code, but instead of “example.com” –> insert the link you just copied (something like: https://www.evernote.com/pub/archinodes/public/)

Which gives you: (click on green button)

** the drawback to this; it seems that login is required…


 

2. More simply, use the RSS Widget (in WP), feed it through the sidebar:


 

3. Third option: the plugin HungryFEED displays your Evernote clippings like this:

[hungryfeed url=”https://www.evernote.com/pub/archinodes/public/” link_target=”_blank” max_items=”5″]

 

 

 

HungryFEED may require a few steps (from FAQ) to work properly:

Road Trip, made in Korsakow

Road Trip, made in Korsakow

no images were found

Road Trip uses footage I shot across Canada in the mid 2000s.
Additional camera work done by Nancy Beaton.

I’m in the process of updating Road Trip to the latest version of Korsakow, a software application originally created in 2000. Korsakow allows users without programming expertise to create nonlinear, or database, narratives. Version 5, released in July 2009, is free and Open Source, and is available for PCs and Macs.

Below is a screen capture of me ‘navigating’ through the narrative. The main frame is top left, and its soundtrack mixes with whichever panel I scroll over. When I select from 1 of the other 3 screens, it becomes the main one and a set of 3 new previews appears.

Roadtrip is a non-linear narrative, but it begins in Langley (B-C), east to Wolfville (NS) and west again, to Montreal (QC). As the navigator, you must find your way along this trajectory or risk looping infinitely in one province…