&NOW 7 Festival: Off the Road

BVL48YgCcAAvas-&NOW 7: Off the Road in Boulder, CO, September 26-28th

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This panel features digital writers and critics from the US and Canada who wish to discuss writing in relation to the field of media archaeology via pieces of hardware and/or software housed in the Media Archaeology Lab (MAL) located at CU Boulder. Ideally, the MAL will bring in to the panel, for audience members to interact with, the piece of hardware/software that each panelist will discuss.

The MAL is headed by Lori Emerson and its focus is on defining moments in the history of computing and digital literature/art. The MAL is a research space, classroom, game lab, hangout, living archive, and repository, that speaks to the concept of undead media, where “the past must be lived so that the present can be seen.” Drawing on Jussi Parikka’s notion of media archaeology as an active archive, the lab has become an opportunity to counter the memory-loss of computer cultures, much of it pre internet and pre new media; “the insistence of the relevance of the old and obsolete is the necessary double of the celebration of the new we have been living.” Mél Hogan will, then, open the roundtable by outlining the conceptual trajectory of the lab itself, as an archive, site of inquiry, and platform for artistic intervention. With the intention of contextualizing and anchoring the work of the MAL, she will situate the lab in relation to other initiatives, such as the Media Archaeological Fundus (MAF) in Berlin, and the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH).

Next, Joel Swanson will discuss his Spring/Summer 2013 residency at the Media Archeology Lab where he has been developing an artwork over the course of the Spring 2013 semester. His piece explores the archeology of computer keyboards as the primary physical interface between humanity and language.

Moving further back in time, Mark Amerika will then discuss a particular, crucial turning point in digital writing and net-art: 1995 and the moment at which the GUI-version of the World Wide Web, especially via Netscape, is only two years old. He will describe how, on the one hand, this moment not only marked the tail end of the long boom in critical theory studies but it also marked the tail end of a relatively new mode of writerly production, hypertext, which had enjoyed its own mini-boom, but had been sequestered away on floppy disks and CD-ROMs. On the other hand, 1995 also marked the beginning of web-based conceptual writing, remixology, theory-fiction and what he calls “Hypertextual Consciousness 1.0.”

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Moving back to the mid-1980s, Lori Emerson will discuss the second volume of Paul Zelevansky’s by-now rare artist book trilogy THE CASE FOR THE BURIAL OF ANCESTORS: Book Two, Genealogy published in 1986 and housed in the MAL. Enclosed in an envelope on the inside of the back cover, the book also comes with “SWALLOWS,” a 5.25″ floppy disk that is a videogame forming the first of three parts in the book. Emerson will discuss this game in terms of the broader field of early digital literature and how it openly plays with and tentatively tests the parameters of the personal computer as a still-new writing technology. Finally, Emerson will discuss the challenges to maintaining access to this work in the MAL either through the original hardware/software or through emulation.

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Also discussing a work from the mid-1980s, Aaron Angello will discuss how one of the great strengths of born-digital literature is in fact what many claim is one of its greatest weaknesses – its ephemerality. Writers of digital literature are in a unique position to embrace the passing of their own work as a positive act of resistance in itself, as a reminder that the static and unitary subject is an illusion that, when accepted as “fact,” will only serve to reinforce existing, often non-productive relationships of power. bp Nichol’s “First Screening,” also housed in the MAL and an early work of kinetic digital literature, is a piece that was composed in basic to be read on an Apple IIe. It is no longer playable in its original form on current, readily available hardware, but has been re-imagined and remade so that it is viewable across a spectrum of current media. Angello will use this piece as backdrop to discuss the roles of both the poet and the archivist.

Moving back to the 1960s and 1970s, Julie Carr will discuss the work of Larry Eigner and its dependence upon and exploration of the typewriter. Larry Eigner was one of the main figures of the Black Mountain School. He had sever physical disabilities and so typed using only two fingers of one hand. When Robert Grenier and Curtis Faville edited his collected for Stanford UP they insisted on typesetting it themselves in courier in order to exactly replicate the page and the typewriter font. Carr’s exploration of the impact of particular typewriters on Eigner’s writing will, again, be supplemented with typewriters currently housed in the MAL

Finally, Derek Beaulieu will then talk about the pedagogical work he undertakes at the Alberta College of Art + Design in Calgary, Alberta. He will discuss how manual typewriters can be used in the contemporary creative writing classroom, the pedagogical outcomes in students and the poetics models on which students can explore — in other words, he will finish our roundtable with a brief tour of the typewriter as a studio tool in the contemporary creative writing classroom.

 

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Internet Research 14.0: Resistance and Appropriation

Logo

Internet Research 14.0:
Resistance and Appropriation

Denver, Colorado  ·  October 24 -27, 2013

Conference Agenda

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or room to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

Session Overview
Session
Bridging the Politics of Digital Academic Production and Social Entrepreneurship

Time:
Friday, 25/Oct/2013:

 

12:50pm – 2:20pm
Location: Horace Tabor
Presentations

*Bridging the politics of digital academic production and social entrepreneurship*

Mary-Elizabeth Luka1, Vicki Mayer2, Mél Hogan3, Jacqueline Wallace1, Mélanie Millette4

1Concordia University, Canada; 2Tulane University, U.S.A.; 3University of Colorado – Boulder, U.S.A.; 4Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada

Digital humanities scholars today are frequently challenged to reach out to non-academic communities and undertake entrepreneurial-like initiatives that connect to corporate agendas, prioritized social engagements or applied research, in order to generate the research funding that success in the academic environment relies on. Sometimes these are successful collaboratories that express complex social values and support cooperative work or start-up environments appropriate to industrial success and workforce-oriented life skills. In other circumstances, these particularly financial or social objectives get in the way of research that is able to resist stagnant or tired patterns of scholarly endeavour or civic involvements. How can provocative and/or collective research interventions fit into this constricted framework? How do marketing, design-thinking, and activism fit together with academic methods and processes, particularly with critical media arts practices and the DIY field? In what ways do research-creation, digital ethnography, self-critical observation and digital media art production help or hinder legitimacy and credibility in the academy? What is the intervention you choose to make as a scholar in the communities with which you engage, inside and outside the university, and how can you measure contributions and recognition that can be accepted at both types of sites of enquiry?

This fishbowl will be moderated by Dr. Vicki Mayer . She is Professor of Communication at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana. Mayer is author or editor of four books about media production in the new economy for creative industries. Since 2009, she has been director of MediaNOLA (medianola.org) to connect university students, professors, and creative sector professionals (archivists, preservationists, etc.) to a digital public history project.

First four speakers:

Jacqueline Wallace (PhD Candidate (ABD) in Communication, Concordia University, and HASTAC Scholar) spent a decade working in the media and tech industries at the intersection of commerce and creativity. She is a former founder of Veer, Inc. an award-winning visual media and design startup and a founding partner in the boutique social media agency, All Beef Media. Wallace is now pursuing research on the micro-economies of DIY design + craft, women’s creative labour and informal production networks.

Mélanie Millette (PhD Candidate (ABD) in Communication, Université du Québec à Montréal, LabCMO) worked as a producer for TV, radio and new media advertising before getting back to the academy. Since 2006, she has worked as a freelance consultant in social media. A SSHRC and Trudeau Foundation scholar, her thesis focuses on the Francophone Canadian minority and how this community uses Twitter to get visibility and political recognition.

Mary Elizabeth Luka is a Vanier Canada Graduate Scholar and PhD Candidate (ABD) in Communication at Concordia University, and HASTAC Scholar. Situated in the digital humanities, her scholarly interests focus on research-creation as method, production practices and creativity in cultural media production, and the intriguing dynamics generated at the intersection of the arts, broadcasting and digital production. With more than a decade of award-winning work as a founder/producer/director of digital and television programming initiatives in public broadcasting, Luka has also worked with over 25 culture sector organizations as a strategic planning consultant.

Dr. Mél Hogan is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Curation in the department of Mass Communication and Journalism at the University of Colorado – Boulder. She is interested in the failures of the (promise of the) archive, data storage centers, feminist media archaeologies, and the politics of preservation. As a practitioner, aspects of these same issues are addressed through media arts interventions. Hogan is also the art director of online and p.o.d. journal of arts and politics, nomorepotlucks.org; on the advisory board of the Fembot collective; on the administrative board Studio XX; a new curator for the Media Archaeology Lab, and a research design consultant for archinode.com.

dh+CU: Symposium on Future Directions

I’ve been asked to participate in this, talking about digital humanities from a pedagogical perspective. Fun. See you in August.

dh+CU

8:30am – 9:00am Breakfast N410
9:00am – 9:15am Welcome

James Williams II, Dean of the University Libraries
Digital Humanities Task Force
N410
9:15am – 10:30am Expert panel

9:15-9:35am
“What Are We Building? Research in This Current Digital Humanities Moment”
Trevor Muñoz, University Libraries/Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities, University of Maryland

9:35-9:55am
“The Changing Landscape of Tenure and Promotion in the Digital Humanities”
Katherine Walter, Center for Digital Research in the Humanities, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

9:55-10:15am
TBA
John Unsworth, Library and Technology Services, Brandeis University

10:15-10:30am
Q&A, discussion N410
10:40am – 12:30pm CU presenters (session one)

10:40-11:00am
“Media Archaeology as Digital Humanities”
Lori Emerson, English

11:00-11:20am
“The Stainforth Database: Rebuilding a 19th-Century Library of Women’s Writing”
Kirstyn Leuner, English

11:20-11:40am
“Practice-Based Research in the Digital Arts and Humanities”
Mark Amerika, Art & Art History

11:40-noon
TBA
Joel Swanson, Technology, Arts & Media Program, ATLAS

noon-12:25pm
Q&A, discussion N410
12:30pm – 1:30pm Lunch CBIS (Norlin 5th floor)
1:30pm – 3:10pm CU presenters (session two)

1:30-1:50pm
“Database Support for the Study of Ancient Chinese Manuscripts”
Matthias Richter, Asian Languages & Civilizations

1:50-2:10pm
“On Digital Curation”
Mél Hogan, Journalism & Mass Communication

2:10-2:30pm
“Museum Anthropology: Digital Strategies for Collaborative Research”
Jen Shannon, CU Museum of Natural History / Anthropology

2:30-2:50pm
A Conceptual Model for Digital Humanities Support #nofilter #YOLO
Deborah Keyek-Franssen, CU System Office

2:50-3:10pm
Q&A, discussion N410
3:10pm – 3:30pm Coffee break CBIS
3:30pm – 4:45pm Breakout discussions (attendee suggested topics) CBIS

Symposium on Future Directions
August 22 and 23, 2013

The goal of the Digital Humanities Symposium is to generate momentum for a rapidly growing and increasingly important area of study by facilitating transformative and cross-disciplinary digital research. We hope to foster new collaborative relationships at an event that will convene CU faculty, librarians, IT professionals, and other administrative and support staff. During the Symposium, invited digital humanities experts will participate in a panel, which will be followed by CU faculty presenting their own digital humanities research projects. There will be ample opportunity for discussion between all symposium participants.

We hope these discussions will lead to a greater understanding of the needs of digital humanities researchers, as well as to many fruitful partnerships among participants. Faculty with an interest in incorporating digital humanities into their research will have the opportunity to share tools and methodologies and also to identify areas for collaboration, with one another and with campus librarians and IT professionals. It also will allow participants to discover in what ways the campus support structure might be improved to better serve current and future research needs in this area.

DH Symposium Workshop – August 23, 2013

During the workshop on the second day, the Libraries’ Task Force and a small group of campus partners will discuss avenues for technical and research assistance in the digital humanities, informed by the previous day’s presentations and conversations. The outside experts will share their candid assessment of faculty needs and offer models for how the Libraries and campus can support existing and future digital humanities efforts. These experts and campus research and technology support specialists will discuss goals for building a more formal digital humanities structure and how these goals can be reached collaboratively. The discussions of the second day will inform a plan for integrated digital humanities support on the CU Boulder campus and shape the Task Force’s plan for how the Libraries can support digital humanities research on campus.

Colloque LA RECHERCHE-CRÉATION : TERRITOIRE D’INNOVATION MÉTHODOLOGIQUE

Colloque LA RECHERCHE-CRÉATION : TERRITOIRE D’INNOVATION
MÉTHODOLOGIQUE
Dates: 19 -21 mars 2014
Lieu : UQAM
Comité organisateur pour la Faculté des arts:
Jean Dubois
Pierre Gosselin
Louise Poissant
Gisèle Trudel
L’intégration des disciplines artistiques dans les universités et l’ouverture des institutions
subventionnaires aux arts ont favorisé l’émergence du concept de recherche-création. Ce
nouveau territoire d’innovations méthodologiques a donné lieu depuis quelques
décennies à toute une série d’analyses et de réflexions visant à baliser le terrain et à poser
des repères pour comprendre ce qui concoure au processus de création, pour faciliter les
collaborations interdisciplinaires, pour valider certaines approches et pour accompagner
la transmission en milieu académique.
La réflexion méthodologique qui se développe actuellement dans les disciplines
artistiques répond en effet au besoin de légitimation rattaché au contexte universitaire. La
place des arts est récente dans les universités et dans les organismes subventionnaires qui
ont développé une longue culture et de nombreuses exigences concernant la
méthodologie. On comprend que par le passé, les artistes, munis de leur intuition, de leur
génie créateur et de leurs savoir-faire transmis par compagnonnage, n’aient pas ressenti le
besoin de questionner leur méthodologie. D’autant que la notion comporte une dimension
prescriptive qui se heurte au sentiment d’indépendance et d’originalité de l’artiste. Mais
le contexte universitaire doublé des croisements interdisciplinaires a favorisé l’émergence
d’éléments de méthodologie et le besoin de réfléchir à ce qui contribue à la démarche
créatrice. En effet, les collaborations et la rencontre de domaines différents que l’on
cherche à pénétrer ou à partager obligent à préciser les étapes et les articulations de la
démarche. Le questionnement de l’autre, partenaire ou collaborateur, exerce par ailleurs
un effet qui retentit sur la position de l’artiste.
C’est en amont de la création que certains ont choisi d’aborder cette question par le biais
d’un nouveau type d’investigation portant sur les méthodologies. Diverses tentatives
tentent en effet de nommer et de décrire ce qui préside au cheminement de l’artiste : la
portée de la théorie dorénavant de plus en plus présente, sédimentée dans les œuvres ;
l’impact de la technique et des contingences matérielles ; le jeu des facultés et les
dispositions mises en œuvre ; les contextes sociaux culturels, voire les habitudes et les
stimulants favorisant la création ; le rôle du hasard et de l’erreur ; la place déterminante
du spectateur et du réseau de diffusion des œuvres. À ces éléments qui président à la
création, il faut aussi ajouter la part de recherche impliquée dans chaque démarche
artistique. Séduits par la magie de l’œuvre, on oublie souvent que Leonardo et
Michelangelo étaient chimistes, ingénieurs et philosophes à leurs heures. La recherche,
qu’elle porte sur les matériaux, les techniques et les savoir-faire, ou sur les thèmes et les
idées cristallisés dans l’œuvre, impose aussi ses contraintes et procédures qui s’ajoutent
et orientent le déroulement de la création. Et si cette dernière a toujours impliqué une part
de recherche, ce n’est que tout récemment que l’on accepte de les considérer
conjointement, dans un mouvement d’interpénétration continu se servant l’une et l’autre
de levain. Recherche et création se nourrissent tour à tour.C’est dans un tel contexte qu’il importe de revenir sur la notion de recherche-création.
Quels sont les impacts des programmes et de la démarche de recherche-création sur la
relation qu’entretient l’artiste à la recherche et à l’enseignement ? En quoi la recherchecréation contribue-t-elle à l’évolution des disciplines artistiques aujourd’hui ? En quoi la recherche-création a-t-elle mené à des innovations d’ordre esthétique, technique ou
méthodologique, à des découvertes sur les processus de création ?
Cette thématique peut se décliner en cinq sous thèmes interconnectés qui permettront de
rejoindre les démarches les plus inspirantes:
1 ) La délimitation du territoire : Spécificité de la recherche création
L’intégration des disciplines artistiques dans les universités a favorisé l’émergence du
concept de recherche-création. Dans sa revue Recherches innovations (Perusse, 2012), le
FRQSC présente la recherche-création comme une nouvelle forme d’activité qu’il dit
reconnaître dans sa spécificité. Mais quelle est la spécificité de la recherche création?
S’agit-il là d’une nouvelle forme de recherche ou d’une nouvelle forme de création, ou
encore de la juxtaposition de deux territoires déjà existants? Ou encore s’agit-il plutôt de
la conjugaison, par un même individu, de deux types d’activités: activités de recherche et
activités de création? Et s’il s’agit d’un nouveau type d’activité, quels en sont les
produits? Peut-on situer la recherche-création à partir des taxinomies de recherche
existantes ou faut-il les modifier pour qu’elle puisse y trouver place ? Quelles questions
méthodologiques l’apparition de la recherche-création soulève-t-elle?
2 ) Méthodes hasardeuses
Bien qu’un processus de recherche systématique puisse généralement aider l’évolution
artistique, l’art donne souvent ses meilleurs fruits de manières imprévisibles selon des
voies balisées par des procédés parfois irrationnels, aléatoires ou accidentels. C’est pour
cette raison que plusieurs artistes tendent à intégrer volontairement des aspects hasardeux
dans leurs méthodes de création afin d’obtenir des résultats inusités sinon inespérés.
Particulièrement depuis Dada, certains mouvements d’avant-garde en ont d’ailleurs fait
leur credo au point de défier radicalement l’apparence de discernement ou de logique. Or,
on se doute bien que cette approche n’obéit pas qu’au chaos et cache forcément des
règles de conduite implicites ou inavouées qui permettent de structurer des œuvres dignes
d’intérêt. Comment les artistes arrivent-ils alors à concilier la tension entre ces deux
tendances? Sans pour autant vouloir échapper à toute forme de rigueur méthodologique,
jusqu’à quel point leur est-il nécessaire de se réserver une marge d’incertitude pour créer?
3 ) “Demo or Die” (Negroponte)
En collaboration avec Hexagram | CIAM
Hexagram | CIAM élabore une culture de la DEMO, mode privilégié de validation et de
partage des savoirs, dans le cadre des échanges entre chercheurs-créateurs comme dans
celui du transfert d’information et de connaissances au sens le plus large. La DEMO
désigne une production qui implique différents médias dans un but esthétique, tout en
confirmant un savoir-faire technique. Il s’agit du “comment” de la recherche-création.
Similaire à la notion d’étude en musique, en tant qu’exploration localisée sur le potentiel
d’une hypothèse, d’un processus ou d’une proposition technologique ou artistique, elle endéveloppe certains aspects ciblés sans prétendre au statut d’oeuvre définitive. Son rôle méthodologique est fondamental, ainsi que sa capacité à accompagner toutes les phases
de l’oeuvre : conception, élaboration, diffusion. Elle joue à chacune de ces étapes un rôle
à la fois catalyseur et archivistique, dans un domaine où les oeuvres sont difficilement
compréhensives et réexposables.

4 ) La recherche-intervention en art
On assiste depuis quelques décennies à l’émergence de toute une série de pratiques
artistiques de type recherche-action ou création- intervention qui impliquent le public à
titre de partenaire. Ces approches expérimentales, formes de laboratoires de vie qui se
déroulent dans la rue, sur la place publique, à l’hôpital, dans le milieu de travail exigent
une réflexion méthodologique. Quelles sont ces nouvelles méthodologies de la recherche
action dans le domaine des arts.

5 ) Typologie des nouvelles approches méthodologiques en art
On assiste à l’émergence de toute une série d’études documentant diverses approches
méthodologiques pratiquées par les artistes en cours de création : systémique,
constructivisme, autopoïésis, enaction, arbre de connaissance, heuristique, carte
cognitive, détournement, bidouillage, bricolage intellectuel, essai / erreur, pratique de
l’écart, expérimentation, imitation, modélisation, démarche processuelle, schématisation,
démo, simulation, visualisation, ne sont que quelques approches qui concourent à la
recherche-création et que les artistes et les théoriciens tentent de décrire pour mieux
cerner la part de découverte et d’innovation dans la création artistique.

Archive Futures: Manuscripts, Materiality, Methods

archfutures

June 21, 2013
ARCHIVE FUTURES: MANUSCRIPTS, MATERIALITY, METHOD

Welcome to the first event of theARCHIVE FUTURES RESEARCH NETWORK.
We are embarking on building an international network to generate imaginative and transformative research exchange around the new questions that are shaping archives and archiving into the future, a future intimately connected to – and likely to be increasingly defined by – digital media. By tackling the status of the material in the era of digitization, the ARCHIVE FUTURES RESEARCH NETWORK productively joins emerging debates across the humanities regarding the character of materiality and matter to debates in the digital humanities concerning emergent modes of research.The questions we want to ask about the theoretical, methodological, epistemological and ontological shifts we are witnessing are not incidental: they are field-defining ones in that they promise to extend our understanding of what happens when our archived cultural heritage is brought together with the promise of the digital. In this respect, our questions are not a supplement to current scholarship and/or archival practice but are key to the production and transfer of new knowledges being generated in this moment of ‘rethinking the archive’.

The Knowledge Synthesis
Lasting Change: Sustaining Digital Scholarshipand Culture in Canada
(2010) observed that a “sustainable digital environment” is one that encourages “the pushing of the boundaries of academic disciplines by cultivating strategic partnerships both across disciplines and beyond the academy” (19).

The ARCHIVE FUTURES RESEARCH NETWORK is specifically configured to enhanceexchange of knowledge across national domains and – most importantly – to promote partnerships acrossthe professional boundaries that frequently separate scholars and archivists.Our first meeting is intended as a catalyst event with the primary aim of laying the foundations for asubstantial new framework for international research collaboration. Plans are already in place for a majormeeting in 2015 at the National Library of Australia in Canberra and between now and then we want toconsolidate research collaboration among members in the form of further exploratory workshops, jointpublications, and grant applications.While we have a full programme for the day, we want to ensure that we also use our time to identifycommon areas of inquiry, shared questions, and ways of collectively promoting speculative andtheoretically informed considerations of ‘archive futures’. Importantly, we see our roles as convenors asfacilitating rather than defining the shape of those considerations and we look forward to an exciting andproductive start to the ARCHIVE FUTURES RESEARCH NETWORK. MARYANNE DEVER AND LINDA MORRA, NETWORK CONVENORS

ICA 2013: Provoke: Five Minutes Feminist Interventions Challenging Communication Research

Provoke: Five Minutes Feminist Interventions Challenging Communication Research

Scheduled Time: Thu, Jun 20 – 8:00am – 9:15am

Building/Room: Hilton Metropole, Hilton Meeting Rooms 16 & 17

Title Displayed in Event Calendar: Provoke: Five Minutes Feminist Interventions Challenging Communication Research

Session Participants:

60 Minutes, Tahrir Square, and Lara Logan’s Body: a Feminist Challenge to Communications Research

Lindsay Palmer (UC Santa Barbara)

Communication for Empowerment: Measurement and Questions of Power

Emily G LeRoux-Rutledge (London School of Economics and Political Science), Dr. Jenevieve Mannell (London School of Economics and Political Science)

Provoke: Disruption and Subversion in the Digital: Women Perform Public Memory

Deborah James (Governors State U)

Paradoxes of Journalism as Profession: An Exploration of Dominant Gendered-Relations in Hindi-Print Journalism

ranu tomar (Tata Institute of Social Sciences)

The Gendering of Mobile Technology in South Asia: Examining How Mobile Phones Are Used by Women/Girls in Rural Pakistan, Bangladesh, and India

Sadaf R. Ali (Eastern Michigan U)

Suture and Scars: Evidencing the Struggles of Academic Feminism

Mél Hogan (Concordia U), Andrea Zeffiro (Simon Fraser U)

Feminist Research Praxis in Multicultural Settings

Koen Leurs (Utrecht University)

Changing the State of Play: Feminist Interventions in Game Culture

Alison Harvey (University of Toronto), Kelly Bergstrom (York U)

Immaterial, Precarious, Affective: Academic Feminism and the Feminization of Academic Labour

Tamara Shepherd (Ryerson University)
Respondent: Sandra Ponzanesi (Utrecht University)

“Your Body is a Battleground”: Theorizing the Politics of the Body in Barbara Kruger’s Feminist Culture­‐Jamming

Michael Glassco (University of Iowa), Meenakshi Gigi Durham (U of Iowa)
Respondent: Anne Balsamo (University of Southern California)

http://convention2.allacademic.com/one/ica/ica13/index.php?click_key=1&cmd=Multi+Search+Search+Load+Session&session_id=191495&PHPSESSID=ajv0fr4o85aa3p3cdi1kjp7ir0

IR14.0 Conference: Bridging the politics of digital academic production and social entrepreneurship

We’ve been accepted to IR14!

————

Bridging the politics of digital academic production and social entrepreneurship

Digital humanities scholars today are frequently challenged to reach out to non-academic communities and undertake entrepreneurial-like initiatives that connect to corporate agendas, prioritized social engagements or applied research, in order to generate the research funding that success in the academic environment relies on. Sometimes these are successful collaboratories that express complex social values and support cooperative work or start-up environments appropriate to industrial success and workforce-oriented life skills. In other circumstances, these particularly financial or social objectives get in the way of research that is able to resist stagnant or tired patterns of scholarly endeavour or civic involvements. How can provocative and/or collective research interventions fit into this constricted framework? How do marketing, design-thinking, and activism fit together with academic methods and processes, particularly with critical media arts practices and the DIY field? In what ways do research-creation, digital ethnography, self-critical observation and digital media art production help or hinder legitimacy and credibility in the academy? What is the intervention you choose to make as a scholar in the communities with which you engage, inside and outside the university, and how can you measure contributions and recognition that can be accepted at both types of sites of enquiry?

This fishbowl will be moderated by Dr. Vicki Mayer

First four speakers:

Jacqueline Wallace (PhD Candidate (ABD) in Communication, Concordia University, and HASTAC Scholar) spent a decade working in the media and tech industries at the intersection of commerce and creativity. She is a former founder of Veer, Inc. an award-winning visual media and design startup and a founding partner in the boutique social media agency, All Beef Media. Wallace is now pursuing research on the micro-economies of DIY design + craft, women’s creative labour and informal production networks.

Mélanie Millette (PhD Candidate (ABD) in Communication, Université du Québec à Montréal, LabCMO) worked as a producer for TV, radio and new media advertising before getting back to the academy. Since 2006, she has worked as a freelance consultant in social media. A SSHRC and Trudeau Foundation scholar, her thesis focuses on the Francophone Canadian minority and how this community uses Twitter to get visibility and political recognition.

Mary Elizabeth Luka is a Vanier Canada Graduate Scholar and PhD Candidate (ABD) in Communication at Concordia University, and HASTAC Scholar. Situated in the digital humanities, her scholarly interests focus on research-creation as method, production practices and creativity in cultural media production, and the intriguing dynamics generated at the intersection of the arts, broadcasting and digital production. With more than a decade of award-winning work as a founder/producer/director of digital and television programming initiatives in public broadcasting, Luka has also worked with over 25 culture sector organizations as a strategic planning consultant.

Mél Hogan is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Curation in the department of Mass Communication and Journalism at the University of Colorado – Boulder. She is interested in the failures of the (promise of the) archive, data storage centers, feminist media archaeologies, and the politics of preservation. Hogan is also the art director of online and p.o.d. journal of arts and politics, nomorepotlucks.org; on the advisory board of the Fembot collective; on the administrative board Studio XX; a new curator for the Media Archaeology Lab, and a research design consultant for archinodes.com.

Congress 2013

Andrea Zeffiro will be presenting our co-authored paper “Suture and Scars: Evidencing the Struggles of Academic Feminism” at Congress 2013

CCA_2013_Finalprogram

University of Victoria June 2013

Congress 2013 is being hosted by the University of Victoria in Victoria, British Columbia. The theme for this year’s Congress is “@ the edge.” The Academic Convenor of Congress 2013 is Dr. Andrew Rippin.

Unrivaled in scope and impact, the annual Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences is known simply as “Congress.” Organized by the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences (CFHSS), Congress brings together academics, researchers, policy-makers, and practitioners to share findings, refine ideas, and build partnerships that will help shape the Canada of tomorrow.

 

Panel 2C:
SG
10:15-11:45
Cornett A221


Disclosing and Documenting/ Divulgation et documentation
Chair/Présidente: Shoshana Amielle Magnet, Univesity of Ottawa
Shoshana Amielle Magnet
Univesity of Ottawa
Representing Insect Sexuality: Queer Theory, Life in the Undergrowth and Green Porno

Caitlin McKinney
York University
10,000 Images, One Scanner, Two Volunteers: Digital Media at the Feminist Archive

Matthew J. Bowman,
Kenneth C. Werbin
Wilfrid Laurier Univeristy
In or Out? Stories of Social Media, Sexuality & Queer Identity

Andrea Zeffiro
Emily Carr University of Art and Design
Mél Hogan
University of Colorado
Suture and Scars: Evidencing the Struggles of Academic Feminism

Program (PDF)

Emergent Technologies in Art and Archiving – BC Lunchtime Series

“Emergent Technologies in Art and Archiving” Spring 2013 Lunchtime Discussion Series (Brakhage Center) May 2013, University of Colorado – Boulder

Please feel free to pass on this message to anyone you think might be interested in a Korsakow workshop on Monday May 6th at 11:30am at the Brakhage Center – ATLAS 311.
Korsakow is a free open source software tool for non-linear storytelling. In this workshop, I’ll cover some of its underlying principals, showcase a few projects using the software (like thisthis and this), reflect on its use as a teaching tool,  and hopefully get everyone building a small project using either your own video/audio/text/images, or files we will provide you. If you’ve worked in Korsakow before and want to show off your work, this is also a good opportunity to do so.
The workshop is very informal and everyone is welcome. Bring your computer. Email me if you have questions.

HASTAC 2013: Korsakow as a Curatorial Tool?

HASTAC 2013: The Storm of Progress

HASTAC 2013 will bring together 5 keynote speakers, 150 refereed papers, panels and demos, a maker space, curated digital performances and over 200 attendees including established and emerging scholars, artists and authors, tech entrepreneurs and teachers,  to explore alternative modes of creating, innovating, and critiquing that better address the interconnected, diverse, interactive global nature of knowledge today, both in the academy and beyond. Our scheduled sessions will deepen our understanding of the role of digital technologies and media and the changes in behaviour and ways of learning and working currently underway.

2013 marks the 10th anniversary of HASTAC’s founding. In that spirit HASTAC 2013 is showcasing work that is either reflective or prescient, that evaluates our digital histories and seeks to construct our digital future(s). We invited contributors to take this opportunity to look back, theorize and archive. We invited them to engage in the creative, if impossible, attempt to glimpse the digital future. We challenged them to shape it. And researchers from across Canada, the United States and Europe and from as far away as Australia are coming to Toronto to share how they and their teams, their research labs,
their classrooms and their students are building the technologies and subjects of the future right now or imagining new horizons of possibility for the ways in which we will make, teach, learn and find community in the coming decade(s).

Sunday April 29 10:30-11:45

Session 40: 

“The Korsakow System: Database Filmmaking for the Web” Matt Soar, Midi Onodera, Mél Hogan (with the help of Eric Coombs), Florian Thalhofer

 


From: http://archinodes.com/node/158

The Designer’s Archive: A Process-Oriented Approach

The Designer’s Archive: A Process-Oriented Approach

 

Tuesday April 16, 2013

Presented by: Regional State Archives, Sweden and School of Design and Crafts University of Gothenburg

The presentation will describe Mél Hogan, Paul Juricic and Jeff Traynor‘s work through the Archinodes Research Design Lab, reflecting on how creative processes translate into design thinking and doing. Much of their work builds off of a re-vision of the archive, and as such emphasizes documentation and visual traces of collaboration.

More >> archinodes.com

 


From: http://archinodes.com/node/158