NMP 47: LOSS

Editorial 47: Loss

Welcome to #47: this is the LOSS issue.

LOSS, as in:

– The fact or process of losing something or someone

– Uncertain as to how to proceed

– Unable to produce what is needed

– Destruction, ruin

– The state or feeling of grief when deprived of someone or something

 

In this issue:

Cover photographer Jah Grey is a self-taught photographic artist primarily focused on portraiture, whose work, as the artist explains, seeks to educate and encourage society to unlearn the teachings that act to separate us in order to advocate for a more fluid and diverse world. Grey’s digital portraits remind us of the similarities we share, despite our differences. (Interview forthcoming! See jahgrey.tumblr.com for more).

Safiya Umoja Noble offers us a powerful reflection on intersectional Black feminism, the loss of Black life, and the need for recovery. On Losing Black Lives, Noble lays bare the despair that is felt when the powerful entrenchments of racism and sexism at both structural and personal levels engulf one’s daily encounters. “Grief is a holding pattern” writes Noble, “a place we keep circulating through, with each new headline of violence or loss of life.” The burden of intersectional Black feminism is to seek out a love that might start to define the terms of Black feminist struggle for lives that are rich with joy and gratitude for the experience of life itself.

Sarah T. Roberts and Ryan P. Adserias share an intimate conversation about their long-term friendship in the face of the loss of a generation of their community, and the looming presence of HIV/AIDS. In Dancing with the Survivors: A Conversation Between Two Friends, Roberts and Adserias articulate the grief of HIV/AIDS, what they describe as “the people who aren’t here and haven’t been for you, and for me, in our adult gay lives.” Roberts and Adserias describe a constant state of loss that foregrounds their lives and interests.

In A Heart beyond Cure, Mark Ambrose Harris contemplates dying, familial homophobia, and pronounced feelings of intimacy that are only possible in the first moments after death. Harris ruminates on the effects of caregiving on mental health, and the ways in which we navigate loss, regret, and other stark reminders of our own and others’ mortality.

Dina Georgis explores Morehshin Allahyari’s recent exhibit, Material Speculation: ISIS shown at Trinity Square Video in March 2016 in Toronto. Georgis consider how in this work, technology offers speculative possibilities in the aftermath of environmental and cultural destruction. In reading reparation through a psychoanalytic perspective, Georgis reflects on what it might mean to create life not against destruction or aggression but by noticing it, understanding its place, and by negotiating its impulses.

In Open to Television – Can television open us to ourselves? Lisa Henderson juxtaposes clips from “Louie” (2013) and “Freaks and Geeks” (1999) to invite us into sweetness and recognition, a usually suspect accomplishment of television on any platform. Henderson’s video essay provokes us to consider longingly missed opportunities and solitude, and in a way that derives a kind of pleasure from absence.

In Always Already? Queer Cultural Production and the Subject of Marriage, Vincent Doyle draws inspiration from the question posed by Judith Butler’s essay: “Is Kinship Always Already Heterosexual?” It asks: How is the subject to whom same-sex marriage is addressed produced? By what affective means? Drawing on which cultural resources? By exploring these questions in the video essay, Doyle excavates his own and others’ subjective investments in marriage and its associated representational strategies at a time when, as Butler argues, it is becoming increasingly difficult to think of and represent coupling and kinship outside of the narrow norms that legitimated and legalized marriage makes.

As always, huge thank-you to Tamara Shepherd (our amazing copy editor), to all the NMP regulars, contributors past and future, and to readers and supporters of the project in so many ways.

Andrea Zeffiro, Mél Hogan and M-C MacPhee

http://nomorepotlucks.org

Editorial 43: Rights

Editorial 43: Rights

Welcome to #43: this is the RIGHTS issue.

RIGHTS, as in:

– Civil Rights; Human Rights; Bill of Rights
– That which is morally, ethically or legally proper.
– To do justice.
– In fairness; justly.

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In this issue:

For the last year and three months, cover photographer Devi Lockwood has been traveling in the USA, Fiji, Tuvalu, New Zealand, and Australia, mostly by bicycle and by boat, to collect 1,001 stories from people about water and/or climate change. To date, Lockwood has collected 442 stories. In this issue of NMP, Lockwood shares a story from from the village of Nukuloa on the island of Gau in Fiji.

In 2012 artist and activist Jessica Whitbread began LOVE POSITIVE WOMEN: Romance Starts at Home (LPW) a social media project which encourages the creation of public and private acts of love and caring for women living with HIV. Whitbread discusses LPW with her friends Jonny Mexico and Theodore (ted) Kerr. Together they explore the role of art and culture within social movements, reflecting on their own experiences and what LOVE POSITIVE WOMEN means in their communities.

In the Spring of 2014, Shar Cranston-Reimer got (gay) married. Cranston-Reimer reflects on the process itself as an opportunity to make sense of the complexity of the experience and to try to make some sense of it in relation to queer rights.

Last year Daphne Chan was NMP’s feature photographer for issue 37: Protect. At that time, Chan was embarking on Transparency: The Gender Identity Project and preparing for a three-month residency in New York City. Chan returns to NMP one year later to showcase another dimension to the Transparency project with What I’ve Learned about Death as a Drag Queen.

It’s Not Your Fault is a short movie by Raven Davis about the violence of online comments made towards Indigenous people, and specifically about Indigenous Women of Canada, and the negligence of online/social media outlets allowing hate speech. The film is a personal response recorded, edited and performed by Davis, as an Indigenous person who has experienced violence by both Indigenous and Non-Indigenous men.

We invite submissions for the next few issues of NMP. Please consult our Guidelines and email us: info at nomorepotlucks dot org.

As we wind down, NMP will come out every 4 months instead of every 2, with all back issues available in print-on-demand (eventually). For now, you can access the NMP holdings in our archive at e-artexte.

As always, huge thank-you to Tamara Shepherd (our amazing copy editor), to all the NMP regulars, contributors past and future, and to readers and supporters of the project in so many ways.

Andrea Zeffiro, Mél Hogan and M-C MacPhee

Editorial 42: Power

Editorial 42: Power


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Welcome to #42: this is the POWER issue.

Power. It’s the ability to exercise control, to claim authority, to dominate and manipulate. Power can be disciplinary, individual, technological or architectural. It can be shared, distributed or concentrated. It can be destructive, haunting. It can be inspiring. It can be seductive, playful. It can be stripped, denied, and resisted.

Power, also, as in:
– power tools
– power play
– superpowers
– power/knowledge

In this issue:

Mary Elizabeth Luka (NMP’s east coast connection) interviews Lee Cripps, a professional artist and arts administrator living and working in Halifax, NS. In Power Centre – Backbone as Metaphor, Cripps explains the process of documenting her life using landscape, portraiture, journalism and expression. Her photography was our selection for the cover of this issue of POWER.

Michael Brendan Baker talks to Vancouver-based artist Howie Tsui about his latest work,Retainers of Anarchy, a multi-disciplinary project — including paperworks, sculpture, built structures, animation, and video — organized around a large-format video projection and an interactive installation component, which will be exhibited at the Vancouver Art Gallery in spring 2017.

nathalie lemoine (né.e kimura byol) is a conceptual multimedia feminist artist who works on identities (diaspora, ethnicity, colorism, post-colonialism, immigration, gender), and expresses it through calligraphy, paintings, digital images, poems, videos and photography. In lemoine’s own words:

mes vidéos de 100 secondes sont conceptuelles. à plusieurs niveaux de lecture… avec des références souvent multi-culturelles et/ou linguistiques. Sachant que je ne réinvente pas le monde ni un language visuel, j’offre des anecdotes, des pensées à crueusér, une vision personnelle de dealer avec les identités au plur.yel.le.

Kaleigh Trace’s “The Doctor Said…” uses anecdotal evidence to explore the ways in which access to power can impact individual’s capacity for bodily self-governance namely in the health care system. In between appointments, she writes. Her work has appeared in GUTS,Shameless, and The Huffington Post. Her first book “Hot, Wet & Shaking: How I Learned to Talk About Sex” (Invisible Publishing, 2014) won the Evelyn Richardson Non-Fiction Award in 2015.

NMP regular, Andrea Zeffiro, interviews Anne Balay about her award winning book, Steel Closets: Voices of Gay, Lesbian and Transgender Steelworkers, a study exploring the lives of forty Northwest Indiana GLTB steelworkers. Balay graduated with a PhD from the University of Chicago, after which she promptly became a car mechanic. Balay moved to Gary, Indiana to teach, and was immediately interested in the steel industry of the region. Her coworker and mentor, Jimbo Lane, suggested that she would be perfectly suited to meeting with and writing about the LGBT workers within the mill community, and Steel Closets was written.

2016 is now in the works but it’s not too late to submit proposals. Email us: info@nomorepotlucks.org

We are also hard at work on finalizing all of the print issues – coming out soon, thanks to Yishan Huang.

Many thanks to Dayna McLeod for guest editing our last issue, themed Aged.

As always, huge thank-you to Tamara Shepherd for copy editing, and to all the NMP regulars, contributors past and future, and to readers and supporters of the project in so many ways.

Mél Hogan, Andrea Zeffiro and M-C MacPhee

NMP 38: Risk

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NOMOREPOTLUCKS

no. 38 – Risk
mar – avr 2015

Online and print-on-demand journal of art, politics and culture
Magazine en ligne d’art, de politique et de culture, imprimé sur demande

Editorial 38: Risk – Mél Hogan, M-C MacPhee and Andrea Zeffiro

Talking About the Queer Public Podcast with Erin McGregor – Mél Hogan

Negrita, Mi Luz – Daniel Brittany Chávez

Falafel – Ryka Aoki

“Red Bloom: A Poetry Altar For” – Margaret Rhee

Miss Butterfly – Shadi Ghadirian

Posthumanism and the Political Problem of Risk – Robert N. Spicer

Read Online: www.nomorepotlucks.org
Follow us on Twitter: @nomorepotlucks
Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/nomorepotlucks

NMP 36: Encounter

NOMOREPOTLUCKS

cover36no. 36 – Encounter
nov – dec 2014

Online and print-on-demand journal of art, politics and culture
Magazine en ligne d’art, de politique et de culture, imprimé sur demande

Editorial 36: Encounter
Mél Hogan and M-C MacPhee

Archiving Queer Temporality in New Orleans with Vicki Mayer
M.E. Luka

Partners in Trans*ition
Sharon, Phoebe and Alice

Encounter/rencontre
François Gaudet

Intimate Kitchens:
Sharlene Bamboat Interviews Basil AlZeri

Close Encounters of a Third Kind: An Interview with Maria Hupfield
Andrea Zeffiro

Read Online: http://www.nomorepotlucks.org
Order your print copy: http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/nomorepotlucks
Follow us on Twitter: @nomorepotlucks
Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/nomorepotlucks
Donate to NMP: Via paypal

NMP 35: Sources

cover35We are thrilled to present you La Centrale Galerie Powerhouse as our guest curators for this Sept/Oct issue no.35 of NMP. Thank you, Jen!

Thank you also to everyone who helped copy edit and assemble this issue.

Mél Hogan & M-C MacPhee (eds.)

Sources – to which we return over and over again

Source – a site where we replenish, renew and recharge

To source – to cite, to seek out, to ground our project in a set of precedents

Source – of energy or impulsion, of even a sense of moving forward from a righteous and vigorous source of struggle

Source – returns to our origins, or sources of inspiration, motivation, sense of justice

We had wanted to use the word re(s)sources because it could work in French or English, and because it referred not only to sources but to the continual returns that we celebrate and interrogate in the special 40th anniversary programming series that inspired this issue.

It is the result of a year of celebrations, queries, research and conversations about impact of a 40-year history of feminist art on contemporary practice. La Centrale was born almost forty-one years ago out of a consciousness-raising group for women artists. We have been working with its living history as our source.

We asked artists to consider our relationship to this source, our history, from the following angles: undermining the authority of history, reanimating the archives, reflecting on feminist canons/anticanons and re-performance. The series aimed to question the impact(s) of historical feminist strategies on contemporary artists. Rather than fix histories in place, we proposed a set of questions about how the past figures within present practices in ways that are in turn playful, commemorative, confrontational and decadently celebratory.

In this issue, Nicole Burisch writes about the artistic practices of Jenna Dawn MacLellan and Wednesday Lupypciw, who both playfully and reverently pay homage to histories of feminist materiality in weaving, but with wildly divergent methods. Nicole Burish places these homages in the context of contemporary craft theory and La Centrale’s history.

What is our responsibility to history? This question brings the most striking answers when posed to those who were around in the very beginning – the founding members of the centre. Eliana Stratica-Mihail speaks with founding members in an interview with artists integral to the creation of the first gallery for women artists in Canada or Québec, Isobel Dowler, Margaret Griffin, Clara Gutsche, Tanya Mars, Stanje Plantenga and Pat Walsh.

From the wild night of the 40th anniversary party, we present a series of images that capture the decadent and sensory rites that marked the momentous occasion of the centre’s birthday. These featured a performance by Noémi McComber, a performative feast by Sonja Zlatanova in the gallery setting of the work of Kirsten McCrae during her residency. Guests continued the theme of performative homage, dressed as a favourite feminist artist or artwork.

Anne Golden completed a research residency this spring and curated a screening that traces the early development of film and video associated with La Centrale in its first decade. Through an imagined diary and homage to early 70s video pioneer Doris Chase (1923-2008), she evokes an era of limited access for women artists to the means to make film and video and a possibility for an art practice very different than what we take for granted today. This kind of fiction, in the face of all too often lost histories, has been a common response by artists to this series. We want to fill in what is missing and the imaginary potential of what we imagine should be in our archives triggers a strong sense of desire to recreate, to fictionalize, to project onto our pasts all kinds of wish fulfillment and a desire to make tangible what we sense so strongly from the past.

It is in this spirit that the artist projects were made and presented at La Centrale this year, and in this same spirit we present you a gleaning of some elements that came into being as the unanticipated outputs of a year full of activity and exchange.

Jen Leigh Fisher
for the Editorial Committee

http://nomorepotlucks.org/

Queered by the Archive: NMP & the Activist Potential of Archival Theory

Working with Andrea Zeffiro on “Queered by the Archive: NMP & the Activist Potential of Archival Theory” which, on my side, will bring together my involvement with NMP with the archival theory I’ve been teaching and writing about via academia.

Accepted for publication (2014) Edited by Andrew Jolivette in Collaboration with the DataCenter, Research
for Justice

Launched on January 1, 2009, www.nomorepotlucks.org (NMP) is the first and only independent web-based and print-on-demand journal of arts and politics in Canada, housed at the Library Archives Canada. Cofounded by Mél Hogan, M-C MacPhee and Dayna McLeod, the project came to fruition, in part from a longstanding friendship, but also from their volunteer experience with the Dykes on Mykes (DoMs) community radio show at CKUT, in Montreal. The project however, was also a decisive response to what they perceived to be lacking in content – politics, ideologies, and aesthetics – in arts and cultural publications. Over the course of the last four years, Hogan and MacPhee hit the proverbial nail on the head in their assessment of what was lacking in queer feminist arts and cultural venues of publication: 29 issues have been published, and upcoming editions of NMP are curated months in advance. NMP supports marginalized voices and modes of knowledge production and dissemination, and therefore facilitates acts of self-determination and cultural autonomy, and those communities – artist, activist and academic – continue to supply the journal with material – art works, reflections, interviews, poetry, works of fiction – all of which document in some regard matters of urgency.  NMP’s stake in research justice however, pertains not only to the journal’s strong feminist underpinnings and visibly queer ethics, but also, and perhaps more importantly, to the archival trajectory of the project and its political implications. In our contribution to Research Justice, we will use NMP as a site of inquiry to explore how the politics of a social movement—queer, GLBT, feminist—are reflected in that movement’s preservation, though by no means always advertently. With this in mind, we attempt to address how NMP positions itself politically through its strategies for sustenance—not so much to come up with a definitive stance about who and what NMP is, or how it can or will be read historically, but rather to demonstrate the correlation between self-preservation and politics, or, in other words, to identify the link between NMP and the activist potential of the history it creates and tells about itself and its community. –Zeff

CFP:

*Research Justice Reader*
Call for Submissions

Edited by Andrew Jolivette in Collaboration with the DataCenter, Research
for Justice

http://speakoutnow.org/userdata_display.php?modin=50&uid=424

http://www.datacenter.org/

Research Justice is the active engagement with communities of color,
indigenous peoples, and marginalized groups to use research as a critical
intervention and active disruption of colonial policies and institutional
practices that contribute to the (re)production of settler colonialism,
heteropatriarchy, nationalism, racism, xenophobia, and human rights
violations against women, the poor, and the most targeted members of our
society.

Research Justice is also a ceremonial celebration of the daily acts of
resistance, revitalization, and cultural autonomy that support the
knowledge production, ways of knowing, design, dissemination, and
stewardship of critical research justice practices by and from the
communities most impacted by globalization and capitalism.

This anthology is a celebration and a recognition of the positive and
innumerable ways that people on the margins utilize research to transform
their communities with the ultimate goal of liberation, self-determination,
and self-actualized freedom. Research justice also prioritizes research
participants as the leaders of any research agenda. The most fundamental
goal of RJ is the development of global citizens who actively work to
transform the structures of power and privilege to engage everyday people
as leaders, change agents, and visionary leaders equipped with the
necessary tools to build community infrastructures that will support the
healthy development of self-sustaining, grassroots, and collective
community based participatory research for the advancement of human rights.

We invite essays from all fields and theoretical frameworks that prioritize
relational ethics, solidarity with research participants and from those
crafting research that focuses on research methods from multiple community
constituencies and transnational vantage points.

Scholarship constructed on the basis of innovative research techniques,
trans-disciplinary methods, effective community collaborations will all be
central to this project of naming and claiming research justice as an act
of self-determination and intellectual freedom.

We are especially interested in essays that document culturally responsive
research methods and innovative interventions that have impacted public
policy in education, health, worker rights, counter movements in response
to anti-blackness, critical mixed race studies, immigrant rights, Native
and Indigenous Pacific rights, de-militarization, and issues related to the
prison industrial complex, queer studies, gender studies, and inter-ethnic
relations.

Submissions by youth, elders, incarcerated or formerly incarcerated people,
and transgender people will also be a priority of this collection

We would be especially appreciative of submissions from tribal leaders,
non-profit, CBO, and NGO leaders, staff members, students, progressive
foundations, and community stakeholders within ethnic specific or
multi/cross-racial/ethnic populations.

Research that documents applied projects/programs that have a proven track
record of creating a pipeline between multiple generational leaders and
across different ethnic, cultural, religious, and gender groups are also
important voices that we would like to include.

Testimonials, art, poetry, and creative projects of all types in written
format or as documented oral histories are also important contributions
that we want to include in this one of a kind anthology that will build
upon the momentum of the Decolonizing Knowledge event hosted by the
DataCenter, featuring Dr. Linda Tuhiwai Smith and Dr. Michelle Fine in
April of 2013.

Any questions or inquiries can be sent to Andrew Jolivette. If you would
like to submit an abstract in lieu of a complete essay please indicate when
you anticipate your ability to complete a full essay with a precise date
before the end of October 2013.

We plan to publish the first Critical *Research Justice Reader* by Fall
2014, so your timely submissions are most appreciated. A central question
to consider as you develop your submissions is how does your
research/project/organization/tribe/center/foundation honor the concept of
research as a ceremonial practice of solidarity, justice, and equity?

All submissions should be between 10-20 pages, typed and double-spaced in
APA format. Chapter submissions should be sent to Andrew Jolivette at
ajoli@sfsu.edu by August 31st, 2013 in word .doc format.

*Obama and the Biracial Factor *
http://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/distributed/O/bo13320228.html

Andrew Jolivette
Associate Professor and Chair (On-Sabbatical Fall 2013)
American Indian Studies Department, EP 103B
Affiliated Faculty, Race & Resistance Studies/Educational Leadership
San Francisco State University
1600 Holloway Avenue
San Francisco, CA. 94132
(415) 338-2701 ~ ajoli@sfsu.edu
~~~~~~~
Visiting Scholar, Native & Indigenous Sexuality & Public Health
American Indian Resource Center
University of California, Santa Cruz
Fall 2013

IHART Alum, Indigenous Wellness Research Institute,
University of Washington

http://www.sfsu.edu/~ais/faculty.htm
http://www.nativewiki.org/Andrew_Jolivette
http://depts.washington.edu/ihartp/index.php
~~~~~~~
Board President, Speak Out
Board Vice-Chair, DataCenter
Board Member, GLBT Historical Society

http://speakoutnow.org/
http://www.glbthistory.org/
http://www.datacenter.org/

NMP 28: Revenge

NMP 28: Revenge

In this issue:

  • Editorial 28: Revenge – Mél Hogan and M-C MacPhee
  • Revenge as Radical Feminist Tactic in the SCUM Manifesto – Moynan King
  • Overcoming Bureaucracy: An Interview with Mandi A. Morgan – Katie Weldon
  • An Open Letter on the Subject of Life on Mars – Sarah Kember
  • Grad School Confidential: In Conversation with Steph Ceraso – Andrea Zeffiro
  • That One Isolated Moment: An Interview with Haley Morris-Cafiero – Jackie Wykes

Check out these submissions and many more at nomorepotlucks.org or order a print-on-demand version of our past issues to read in the tub, during a picnic, or on the metro.
If you’d like to submit your work to NMP, click here or email us at info at nomorepotlucks dot org.

Design Crush: Profiling Jacqueline Wallace

Design Crush: Profiling Jacqueline Wallace – Mél Hogan

 

In this piece I wanted to highlight the work of my good friend and collaborator, Jacqueline Wallace. Some people are incredible – yet incredibly understated – and so this became an opportunity for me to profile Jacquie’s work, which makes important connections between design, academia, and feminist politics. Together we tease out the intricacies of work, in and out of academia, from a start up called Veer to a dissertation about women’s cultural production.

MH: Can you talk about your background in design?

JW: I’ve always had a strong aesthetic sensibility, but I came to really know design by working at Veer. I was part of the startup team that founded the company in 2002. We produced, curated and distributed images, type and motion footage for use by creatives working in advertising, design and publishing. Veer wasn’t just a random start-up. Many of us had worked together at earlier companies in the visual media industry. When a number of us were spun out after an ownership change at the previous company, we felt there was still opportunity in the market, but we knew we needed to do things differently. The other major players in our market space were big, faceless companies–the Walmarts of the industry. Veer, on the other hand, was steeped in design. Our goal was to inspire creativity at every touch point. In fact, the company was purposefully called ‘Veer’ to diverge from the norm and disrupt an established market by presenting our products (digital photography, illustration, typefaces and motion footage) with imagination and style. We looked to appeal to the design sensibilities and “inner circle” of peers in the graphic design community who would understand the cultural references and vocabulary of our brand and voice, lend it credibility and find affinity with it.

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